Considering all of the medications used in psychiatry, and the progressiveness of scientific technology and understanding in the past 100 years, psychiatric drugs have an (overall) amazing record.

  • Opioids
    • Not taken off the market for  direct, physical safety, but due to abuse
    • Were used up until the 1950’s, when it wasn’t understood that opioids could not trick the brain into a long-standing, antidepressant function
    • Suboxone, a combination of buprenorphine and nalaxone, has been investigated in low doses for treatment-resistant depression
      • many active metabolites
      • various actions on the opioid receptors
        • a μ receptor partial agonist, preventing the abuse caused by full agonists (other opioids)
        • a κ receptor antagonist, preventing dysphoria
      • Naloxone prevents abuse
  • Wellbutrin (Bupropion extended-reelase)
    • Caused seizures when first released, but was put back on the market in lower doses
    • An extended-release medication
    • Have personally known doses to go up to 600 mg
    • Largest dose in one pill is 450 mg
  • MAOIs (Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors)
    • Some are acutely dangerous, causing such illnesses as, but not limited to…
      • Some forms of hepatitis
      • Liver damage
      • Jaundice
    • Actually led to some deaths, mostly due to strokes from hypertension
      • It was then discovered that avoiding certain foods would avoid hypertension
      • Then, two MAOIs, not those of acute danger in regular use (as aforementioned), were put back on the market
    • Very safe these days
      • Studies on them exceed 50 years
      • The diet restriction has been overplayed, per MD’s I’ve spoken with directly
      • Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: A Clinical Colloquy (2014)
        • “Due to a lack of familiarity, physicians resist prescribing MAOI therapy–arguably the most effective treatment for mood and anxiety disorders, especially atypical depression. The dietary restrictions are humble compared to the risk of mood disorder. In any depression treatment algorithm, consider the early implementation of MAOI therapy”
  • Clozapine (Clozaril)
    • Caused highly compromised immune symptoms in some, leading to death
    • Clozapine taken off the market, re-introduced due to amazing efficacy against schizophrenia – testing procedure catches any serious side effects
      • First six months: a blood test every week
      • Next six months: a blood test every two weeks
      • Ensuing tests: every for weeks
    • Please visit the Clozapine page for information into its remarkably paramount mechanism of action
  • Pondimin (fenfluramine)
    • Most notorious, the primary screw-up
    • Caused many cardiovascular problems
    • Wasn’t even used for a mental illness, but for obesity (which is strangely not itself a mental illness, despite treatment with psychiatric medications)

So out of all the medications that have some psychiatric use, only one, fenfluramine (which again wasn’t used for an official mental illness), was thrown away completely.